insects

Daffodils announce the beginning of spring

  • They are one of the rare species of plants that are able to successfully grow through the snow.
  • Due to toxic sap in the stem, daffodil should not be kept in the vase with other plants.
  • Squirrels won’t eat daffodils due to these poisonous crystals — be careful to keep away from dogs, too.
  • There are at least 25 different daffodil species and up to 13,000 hybrids according to the Daffodil Data Bank.
  • Daffodils are surprisingly tolerant of cold, and they’re an ideal flower for novice gardeners

Plan ahead and buy yourself some daffodil bulbs, ready for planting in September. This will bring you beautiful flowers for next spring!

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Create a safe watering spot for insects

Insects get thirsty too, and here’s a great idea as to how you can help!

  • Grab a shallow dish – this can be anything from a bowl in your kitchen, to a plastic pot headed for the recycling. A clean, empty mushroom tub or sausage tray would work perfectly.
  • Fill with different sized marbles or similar sized stones – this creates a platform for the insects to sit on whilst drinking.
  • Find a level spot to place your drinking station
  • Finally – Fill it two thirds of they way with fresh tap water.

Step back and watch to see which insects visit!

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Create your very own butterfly feeder

You can use almost anything as a platform for your butterfly feeder, from a plastic or paper plate, to an upturned terracotta pot.
Hang them from a tree or place on the floor and fill with nectar, fruit pieces or flowers.

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Create a log pile in your garden

You can encourage all sorts of animals to your garden by creating log piles. From birds, beetles, frogs and even hedgehogs, you’ll create an animal haven.
If you have a trail camera, try popping it down next to your pile and see what visitors you have!

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Make Wildflower Seed Bombs for your garden

Insects thrive on wild flowers, so, by creating these seed bombs, you’re not only keeping the kids creative, you’re helping out your local wildlife too!

All you need is: household flour, compost and wildflower seeds. You can gather your own seeds, by scouting around the garden!

Follow the steps below and show us how you get on by adding your iDot to the website:

  • Use a ratio of one cup of flour to 3 cups of compost and combined it well before adding our seed.
  • Once you’ve added your seed, try to handle it gently so not to damage any of them!
  • Add just enough water so that the mixture holds together.
  • Then form your little seed bombs, making them about the size of a marble.
  • Leave to dry out for 24 hours.

Once your seed bombs have dried out, take a walk around your garden and scatter them around. If you don’t have a garden, you can scatter them in a few pots and place them on your windowsill!

Photo credit: Craft Invaders

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